Grantee Corner  |  Galveston Independent School District



Galveston Independent School District currently serves 6,922 students in Pre-K through 12th grades. The district serves 71 percent economically disadvantaged students, 34 percent at-risk students, and 16 percent English language learners. Forty-six percent of the students are Hispanic, 24 percent are African American, and 27 percent are White. Through Magnet Schools Assistance Program (MSAP) funding, the district was able to implement six new magnet programs at three different campuses. The campuses include Ball High School, Scott Collegiate Academy, and Weis Media Arts and Technology Preparatory Academy.

Ball High School, a comprehensive high school, houses four small learning communities: Innovation and Entrepreneurship; Media Arts and Digital Technology; science, technology, engineering, and mathematics (STEM); and Biomedical Engineering and Medical Professions. Each community has the potential to serve 400-450 students. . Students who complete the coursework within these communities are eligible to receive one or more endorsements from the State of Texas on their high school diplomas that shows they have completed in-depth coursework in arts and humanities, business and industry, public service, multidisciplinary studies, and STEM. Through its partnership with the local community college, every student at Ball High School has the opportunity to earn 12 college credit hours and/or a career certification upon graduation. Ball High School earned a Texas Education Agency Distinction for Postsecondary Readiness in 2014.

Scott Collegiate Academy serves grades 5-8. The school has a college-going culture and engages students through blended learning and project-based learning. Students are immersed in Advancement Via Individual Determination (AVID) strategies, which support them taking rigorous high school courses in their 8th grade year.

Weis Media Arts and Technology Preparatory Academy is a grades 5 and  6 campus. Students participate in interdisciplinary activities that focus on research-based practices for project-based learning and on the integration of technology.

Each of the six magnet programs has a Community Advisory Board that meets four or more times a year to share its members’ expertise. Community participants serve as guest speakers, mentors, intern sponsors, and ambassadors for the schools and the district. They have provided the programs with in-kind contributions such as use of specialized equipment, facilities, and experts in the field.

Dr. Annette Scott, Assistant Superintendent for Curriculum and Instruction, leads the MSAP project implementation. Dr. Scott previously served as principal of a magnet school. She has 28 years of administrative experience with an extensive background in gifted education, at-risk populations, and curriculum management. She is also the past president of Magnet Schools of Texas and the MidSouth and currently serves as a Regional Director for Magnet Schools of America.

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